The Gallery

  It is more than just seeing, but having something to look at. At The Gallery at The View on Elm, you can not only browse our thousands of unique eyeglass frames, but also see a collection of contemporary art work. Our work is chosen specifically by our curator and rotates every six to eight weeks. For more information about the work currently on view, our artists, or having your own work hung, please contact us at...

Read More

Bill Crowder

  Bill is attracted to both abstract and realist styles in his art. He enjoys plein air painting, but most often he gains inspiration from his own photographs. With his abstract painting he will sometimes start with photos and manipulate them or begin with random areas of color and texture. In his realistic painting, the images are important but when enhanced can express an atmosphere or mood at the time. Come see Bill’s work that is up April through June. For more information about the Bill’s work currently on view or if you have any questions please contact us @...

Read More

Sally Donnell Rilee

A painter’s thought processes involve exploring both ideas and colors. Some ideas start with landscapes. Riding in a car taking pictures of trees and mountains with movement or walking around a lily pond in spring, summer or fall. The water lilies disappear down under the water for the winter and then come up PINK in spring! The fog on rainy, grey days (that will be another series). There are so many different colors of greys. Paintings usually like to get said simply and sometimes just one color is all it takes. Less is often more so the process may be about what can be taken out of the painting rather than what else can be put in. The better painting might often be done through subtraction rather than addition. One idea leads to another so the work is constantly changing. An idea might not get onto a canvas and painted for years and then one day resurfaces and cannot wait any longer. The End of the Day series of smaller painting are added o at the end of every workday to clean the palette of paint. Mixing the constantly changing leftover colors together makes new colors that might never have been used. They are done with a palette knife rather than a brush to help use all the scraps. The end pieces of linen and the end pieces of wood from framing also get used too. And they are hen get turned into money for more paint!   Sally Donnell...

Read More